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Freedom for Belarus by michal1995 Freedom for Belarus by michal1995
Belarus is country where people don't have freedom.

Short history of Belarus:

1944 - Belarus is one of soviet republics
1986 - After a catastrophe in Chernobyl large surface of Belarus was polluted by radioactive fallout
1991 - During the dissolution of Soviet Union Belarus become a free country.
1994 - Alexander Lukashenko become a president of Belarus. Lukashenko had changed the flag from white-red-white strips [link] to flag that was used during communism [link] . Belarus is in fact a communistic country.

Now people hate Alexander Lukashenko because he manipulate the elections, so I decided to make this stamp. I'm not from Belarus, but in XVI XVI and XVII centuries was a part of The Polish–Lithuanian Commonwealth [link] .
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:iconthe-conquerors:
The-Conquerors Featured By Owner Feb 9, 2015  Hobbyist Writer
I know about this dude. He is nothing but a a Soviet loving weeb like that Patrylotso9s guy who sold out his country for some mythical golden age of the Soviet Union. Strangely I have not seen any Communists here on Dart praise him. Strange all things considered, since a lot of them have the same mindset as this dude. In short I like your post and it needed to be said. I'm off now. ~ C
Reply
:iconmichal1995:
michal1995 Featured By Owner Feb 10, 2015  Hobbyist General Artist
There are not many followers of him here, because a few years ago 40% of household didn't have electricity (I don't have up to date data). However most of people that do and have Internet know a little bit more then crowd.
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:iconrodegas:
Rodegas Featured By Owner Edited Jan 31, 2015
yes,  Belarus need more multinational corporations, Muslims and homosexuals, otherwise you are not free, bla bla bla...
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:iconmichal1995:
michal1995 Featured By Owner Feb 1, 2015  Hobbyist General Artist
I conciser Poland free, and there are little of them in here.
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:iconoriginalczechball:
originalCzechball Featured By Owner Dec 22, 2014
Destroying Lukashenklo regime will lead country into the chaos. Only way how to change Belarus is change Russia....
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:iconmichal1995:
michal1995 Featured By Owner Dec 22, 2014  Hobbyist General Artist
It depends on what you consider chaos. It will surly lead to at least some of it, but perhaps Russia will also change. Right now it is slowly heading towards the critical point. The question is - what will come after that point?
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:iconalextj10:
AlexTJ10 Featured By Owner Sep 28, 2013  Student Artist
Wolność dla Białorusi. Precz z Łukaszenką i jego sługusami.
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:iconryfkah:
Ryfkah Featured By Owner Sep 7, 2013
Poor Bealrus :(
I hope it will get freedom one day, they're so nice people. Hopefully someone get's Lukashenko out of the gouvernment, so they can have a democratic system.
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:iconnoodlegoo:
NoodleGoo Featured By Owner Aug 22, 2013  Student General Artist
I honestly support getting Lukashenko's ass out of Belarus, but am I the only one commenting on this stamp that is from that country?
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:iconmichal1995:
michal1995 Featured By Owner Aug 25, 2013  Hobbyist General Artist
Seams like it. In fact I thing we are only Slavs that commented here (although I posted it like... 3 years ago...)
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:iconnoodlegoo:
NoodleGoo Featured By Owner Aug 25, 2013  Student General Artist
Well, I guess Slavs and some Russians wold feel the same way too, ya know :la:
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:iconatlas231:
Atlas231 Featured By Owner Mar 28, 2013
As a Swede I can do nothing else than support disolving Europes last dictatorship. As you might have heard, their goverment isnt exactly happy with our efforts though.
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:iconmichal1995:
michal1995 Featured By Owner Apr 5, 2013  Hobbyist General Artist
Yeach - sure thing. Although Ukraine is more pro-Poland, Belarus is more pro-Russia, and we do know how their "democracy" looks like
Reply
:iconatlas231:
Atlas231 Featured By Owner Apr 5, 2013
What does Ukraine and Poland have to do with this now? Sorry, Im no expert on all the individual eastern nations.
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:iconmichal1995:
michal1995 Featured By Owner Apr 5, 2013  Hobbyist General Artist
Main goal is to bring Ukraine to EU and make it's let's say PR better. Also some economical support (especially in farming - In fact Ukraine is able to feed like 1/3 of Europe due to it's great ground, but they buy food from abroad because they don't have enough money). But the main reason is much more important. When Ukraine is closer to Poland and Eu (same stands for Belarus, and Baltic Nations) is more far away from Russia.

You see (warning - historical info) - through ages Poland have 2 main enemies - Russia and Germany. Poland many times failed when those two were against us. And I have to mention that until II w.w. Poland was exactly between Germany and USSR (previously Prussia and Russia). For example during II w.w. Poland loosed independence for over 50 years because Germany attacked with USSR. If Poland would fight lonely against USSR communism would fail in 2 years max. Worst with Germany but in fact Hitler didn't want to attack Poland till spring 1939. I recommend for you to read book "Pakt Ribbentrop-Beck" (polish title - new book, so look for some translations on the Internet). It shows deeply situation in Poland.

And now back to nowadays - Since Belarus and Ukraine are between Poland and Russia it is important for Poland to be allays with those two. They duplicate citizens and adds more way for Russia to travel when they would attack. In fact this also concerns for Ukraine and Belarus. However they would only change alignment (like Poland did in 1989), but Russia would have less "buffer territory" from Moscow. And the more closely Ukraine and Belarus are for Poland, the more those two are to join EU and NATO (and Germany). Moreover - Poland did something like this with Baltic Nations. And I thing also with Czech, Slovakia and even Hungary. Poland is strong here, but alone is week (well I heard that when Ukraine want to make some business with US they first go to Poland - not sure of that).

So to sum up you can say that what's going on in those countries is Polish business ;)
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:iconatlas231:
Atlas231 Featured By Owner Apr 5, 2013
Im... Not sure I understood that.
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:iconmichal1995:
michal1995 Featured By Owner Apr 6, 2013  Hobbyist General Artist
Witch part?
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:icondragonquestwes:
DragonQuestWes Featured By Owner Nov 22, 2011
I'm not from Belarus...

But I support Lukashenko. (´・ω・`)

I know this isn't an answer you'd be expecting. But my reason for supporting the man is because he managed to save the country from suffering the fate that the rest of former Soviet nations have been suffering.

As of 2009, Belarus has a 1% unemployment rate.
GDP growth rate is around 7.6% as of 2010.
[link]

It has been ranked #61 on the Human Development Index by the United Nations.
[link]
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:iconmichal1995:
michal1995 Featured By Owner Nov 22, 2011  Hobbyist General Artist
1% unemployment rate is to low and a bit dangerous. People are very lazy in that situation. In Poland during communism was saying (not direct translation): "No mater if you're standing, or lie, 1500 (Old zloty) should be" Originally: "Czy się stoi, czy się leży tysiąc pięćset się należy"
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:icondragonquestwes:
DragonQuestWes Featured By Owner Nov 22, 2011
No it is not dangerous and neither is it lazy. It makes no sense to call a 1% unemployment rate a bad thing. While it is impossible to reach 0%, calling the 1% rate dangerous is out of the question unless proof is provided.
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:iconmichal1995:
michal1995 Featured By Owner Nov 22, 2011  Hobbyist General Artist
In both Social Studies and Basics of Economy (classes learned in all Polish schools) you can hear that optimal is 4%. When it's too low people become lazy because even if they loose job, they would get another no mater what.
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:iconcosmic--chaos:
Cosmic--Chaos Featured By Owner Nov 15, 2011  Hobbyist General Artist
I'm glad someone made a stamp for this. I'm not Belorussian either, but I was devastated when I saw such brutality inflicted on the protesters last December. All they wanted was freedom... :(

Жыве Беларусь! супрацівіцца !
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:iconmichal1995:
michal1995 Featured By Owner Nov 15, 2011  Hobbyist General Artist
Да. The only thing that I hope won't happen are sick demonstrations like that one in London or in Poland in 11th November (Polish independent day). An angry crown started to fight witch everyone including press, police and everyone near them just for make some destruction.

PS: And what you mean by "супрацівіцца"? I'm learning Russian (I understand Жыве Беларусь), but I can't understand that one...
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:iconcosmic--chaos:
Cosmic--Chaos Featured By Owner Nov 17, 2011  Hobbyist General Artist
I was cut off from the internet and television all summer, so I'm afraid that I don't know much about the London riots. However, I did hear a proposal to temporarily shut down social networking sites there at the the time, which alarmed me.

As for the Polish Independence Day incident, I was deeply saddened at the conflict between separate political groups. They should be celebrating happily as one people. Why fight about a good day in Polish history? :(

And "супрацівіцца" means "Resist" in Belorussian.
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:iconmichal1995:
michal1995 Featured By Owner Nov 19, 2011  Hobbyist General Artist
In fact politic weren't fighting that day. People that were fighting were hooligans (they just wanted to fight with someone without any reason). I don't appreciate this especially it's the only holiday in Poland with reminds something nice (other holidays: 3th may - Constitution (1791) - total disaster - occupation for 123 years, Warsaw Uprising - destroying the biggest city and changing it's population from 47.700 to 1.000 etc.) Almost all Polish holidays reminds something bad, and shows Poland as a country used by other countries, with intolerance towards others etc., so it's really easy (unfortunately) to make this happen again.

And as for the "супрацівіцца" I didn't know that it was in Belorussian especially they don't even use their language.
Reply
:iconcosmic--chaos:
Cosmic--Chaos Featured By Owner Jan 29, 2012  Hobbyist General Artist
Damn, I'm late to reply to this... sorry DX

But yes, it's shameful how a bunch of people cause trouble on a day that's meant to be celebrated. :(
And it sucks that Poland is one of the most subjugated countries; maybe others are jealous of its bravery.

...As of today, however, The Third Polish Republic has existed for 23 years. :salute:

Lastly, супрацівіцца means "resist" in Belorussian.
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:iconkrimalfancey:
KrimalFancey Featured By Owner Jul 24, 2011  Student Digital Artist
woo
I'm glad that someone else know about Belarus ^^
It is like scary circus around D8

Love this stamp)
Reply
:iconmichal1995:
michal1995 Featured By Owner Jul 24, 2011  Hobbyist General Artist
Thanks. I know what terror is there and how the "elections" are going. Fortunately because of Polish east politic (Poland is more interested in east than the rest of EU) in some future elections Lukashenko will not be selected. I hope that this day will come soon.
Reply
:iconkrimalfancey:
KrimalFancey Featured By Owner Jul 24, 2011  Student Digital Artist
Many people are now protesting in the streets.
And I think it will not last forever....
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:icondragonquestwes:
DragonQuestWes Featured By Owner Nov 22, 2011
I know it may not last forever, but truth be told... Lukashenko isn't half the dictator as most people (in the West) say he is.

He's actually managed to keep the country in better shape than most of the former Soviet nations. Even beating Russia in the Human Development Index.

[link]

Now for some useless random (or not) information: A guy by the name of Stanislav Shushkevich wanted a free-market system in Belarus, but he wasn't able to implement it once he was beaten in the 1994 election by Lukashenko. I believe if Lukashenko wasn't president, Belarus would be in worse shape than it is now, assuming you know what free-market systems do... (´▽`)
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:iconmichal1995:
michal1995 Featured By Owner Nov 22, 2011  Hobbyist General Artist
I have to disagree with you. Why? That's why:

1) Look at countries like Lithuania, Latvia, Estonia or even Russia and Ukraine. All of them are of the former Soviet Union (CCCP) nations, and they are in better shape than Belarus.
2) Communistic economic system is inefficient. [link] and [link]
3) Lukashenko is a dictator. All dictators are somehow mad and resist (basics of psychology) and Lukashenko is not an exception. Proof: if he was good people won't be protesting (why they should?)
4) Don't forget that Russia have Siberia. I thing that HDI there is very low, so it pull down countries average. And again look at Lithuania, Latvia, Estonia and Ukraine.
5) Lukashenko is winning elections since 1994. In last elections he "get" 85%. Isn't that weird?
6) In Poland free-market system (as you should know from above links) was introduced by a shock therapy. And guess what? After 3 mounts inflation decried form 700% to 1%, shops become full with products (before that they were completely empty), factories become efficient and profitable. And after that you (don't forget that you have Polish (yes POLISH!) surname) say that free-market system is some sort of a bad thing? WTF?
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:icondragonquestwes:
DragonQuestWes Featured By Owner Nov 22, 2011
1. Just the ones closest to Europe? What about other Eastern European countries like Georgia, Armenia, Azerbaijian and the Central Asian nations of the former Soviet Union?
2. Irrelevant, and plus, the whole "Communism doesn't work" mumbo jumbo was not decided out of reality, it was decided out of politics. Of course, it doesn't really matter whether or not many of the Eastern European nations and the Former Soviet Union should return to Communism. It's about keeping the country afloat.
3. No he isn't. Just a few protesters are not enough to show he's a "dictator." That is not proof nor is it solid enough evidence, anybody can protest any leader. There has to be SOLID evidence of tyranny in order to make us believe that he is one.
4. That's because most of Russia's population lives west of the Ural mountains. However, unlike Belarus, Russia has a problem with HIV/AIDS that is even worse than Belarus. Page 12 of this report shows a table of HIV cases in Russia:
[link]
5. How is this a problem? 85% is not weird at all. Anybody running for president could have won a landslide. People are what form their governments. Again, no solid evidence.
6. While I admit that Poland did manage to avoid the recession from the late 2000s, there's an unemployment rate of about 9.4% as of August 2011.
[link]
Not to mention the increasing poverty in Poland:
[link]
(Yes, I know it decreased quite a bit from 2004 but it shows the rampant poverty that's increasing.
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:iconmichal1995:
michal1995 Featured By Owner Nov 22, 2011  Hobbyist General Artist
1) Belarus is in Europe, so we can compare it with other European countries (don't know about Asia, but Kazakhstan is quite rich). And check maps. Georgia, Armenia and Azerbaijan are in Asia not Europe
2) It take ages to make decision about something in communism and socialism. And also many times that decisions were bad. For example Poland have many great prototypes of cars, better than East European standards, but polish government or SU said нет, and continue to produce one low-quality model of car (Fiat 126)
3) It's not that easy. It's not that dictator=resist, but dictator>>resist. And as some intelligent people say: "Dictator is the best type of Government only when dictator is good" Lukashenko isn't good.
4) Russia also have problems with road communication and alcohol. While in Belarus only about 60% of houses have eclectic.
5) It is a problem. Nobody in real democratic countries was president for such a long time. And some other thing (again Poland). Polish Constitution is one of most (if not the most) anti-communism and anti-resist in whole world. Look at Art. 127 us. 2: "President of Polish Republic is chosen for fife years cadence and can be chosen again only one time" So maximum for 10 years. Lukashenko is President for 17 years. In last elections wining party in Poland get only 39.18%
6) In 2007 Poland was the only country witch economy was growing (slowly, but...). And predictions says that in that Christmas Poles are going to spend more money then Germans.
6.1) Increasing poverty? In 2004? Well in 1985 average salary was 35$ per month. Now minimal is 454$ (average - 970$). Although Poland have chose a shock therapy, it is still going on.

And just to make sure you know:
You - In US. From where data - mostly Internet. Some informations.
I - In Poland. From where data - Internet, Document's and News in TV. Lots of information.
Reply
:icondragonquestwes:
DragonQuestWes Featured By Owner Nov 22, 2011
1. Whether Georgia, Armenia and Azerbaijan are considered part of Europe or Asia has no absolute answer. So there is no wrong answer in that.
2. No it doesn't. Any system could make good or bad decisions. Socialism and Communism are economic systems, and the latter has not been truly experienced. I do not see the relevance of cars in relation to Communism.
3. This has nothing to do with "Dictatorship being the best government." This is about being objective regardless of economic/political policies. There is no such thing as a perfect government.
4. The whole lack of electricity in Belarus has usually been a result of some disputes between them and Russia. Russia provides 10% of the electricity for them.
5. It doesn't matter how long Lukashenko has been in power. If being president for 17 years makes him a dictator, then Ólafur Ragnar Grímsson of Iceland would be considered a dictator for being president for 15 years. So no, it is not a significant problem. The Polish political system is VERY conservative and I say this as I am half Polish myself. Democracy is not the opposite of Communism. Capitalism is. Communist or Socialist Democracies can exist.
6. True, but I don't see the relevance of Christmas in relation to economics. But earning $454 a month does not negate the poverty rate.

Where I live and where you live is irrelevant. It doesn't matter how much information I or you are provided. It's a matter of being objective. Not having "lots of info." Which is why I prefer "quality over quantity."
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(1 Reply)
:iconmichal1995:
michal1995 Featured By Owner Jul 25, 2011  Hobbyist General Artist
That's sure. The question is how long it will take. For example in People's Republic of Poland protest first start in 1956 (Poznań 1956 protests - [link] ). Than were June 1976 protests ([link]), August-Strikes 1980 in Poland, and Martial law in Poland (1981-1983 [link]) before Poland become republic again in 1989.
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:iconyoungbow:
youngbow Featured By Owner Apr 13, 2011  Hobbyist General Artist
Agreed. Lukashenko is a sick, twisted, downright bastard who is instilling the worst of the USSR back into his country. Don't believe me? Well then believe the people of Belarus who were arrested, imprisoned, silenced or mysteriously disappeared/murdered under this evil man's regime.
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:iconsawokmrgreen:
SawokMrGreen Featured By Owner Apr 10, 2011  Hobbyist Digital Artist
LONG LIVE BELARUS !!!!
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:iconshadowthecat971:
shadowthecat971 Featured By Owner Mar 3, 2011  Hobbyist General Artist
dictatorships are baaaaad. i'm not from Belarus either, but i DO know that it's between a rock and a hard place at this point.
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:icongreatfuldead:
GreatfulDead Featured By Owner Jan 26, 2011
I'm so glad someone made this. I'm not from Belarus and I've never been there, but it's a dictatorship. The elections were unbelievably illegitimate. ):
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:iconmichal1995:
michal1995 Featured By Owner Feb 18, 2011  Hobbyist General Artist
You're absolutely right. I wasn't happy when I heard about results of the elections in TV, so I made this stamp. I hope that things in Belarus will change, but it can take long time (I also hope that Belorussian government won't block DeviantART because of it).
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